I realize that most college ministry “structures” with leaders – small groups, ministry teams, volunteer teams, etc. – are based around the daily work of either pastoring or producing some sort of effect. Small group leaders certainly might have a general curriculum for the semester, but their “work” centers on the sheep in their fold (as it should). Large Group Meeting Team (which in most cases has a far more engaging name) focuses primarily on getting Tuesday nights “pulled off” with excellence and impact every week (as they should). Hospitality Team, meanwhile, stays hard at work making sure people feel welcomed (a vital task indeed).

But in the interests of presenting a stretchy possibility (the stuff of the weekly Frideas), let’s consider this: What if the leaders of these teams prepared “strategic plans” for their semester? All this would mean is offering goals – with how-to-get-theres and potentially even deadlines. And ideally, these goals would involve improvement, a moving-forward, something that might even outlast their tenure in this leadership role or at least describes where they hope to take the people under their care.

So a small group leader might outline the ground they feel their group should take in various measures – from Bible study methods to gaining humility. Evangelism Team leaders might identify a group on campus that seems underreached, and outline ideas for reaching those students. Your Events Team head may see room to involve more of your ministry’s students, or simply to cut costs.

College students aren’t regularly pushed to think about “plans” like an employee (including many ministers) might be. But why shouldn’t they be? This is one mechanism that might be worth playing around with, to see what fruit might come from asking your student leaders to focus both on the daily work and long-term growth.