As I’ve written many times, brainstorming is often easier (and often bears better fruit) when we begin with some sort of “springboard” and/or “guardrails.” Today’s suggestion is an obvious example of that, but it’s also a way to get students more deeply involved in your ministry.

What if you went down the list of majors represented in your ministry, and brainstormed – for each and every one – ways to get those people involved more deeply? This could include anything from raising up leaders to simply having students tag along for deeper ministry activities – the latter an amazing form of discipleship we often “never get around to.”

Some examples:

  • First up in your list you find a Psychology major. What if she joined a few of your pastoral care conversations with fellow students in the coming weeks?
  • Then you see a Communications major, and you know there are more. What if they formed a team to suggest – or carry out – recruitment campaigns for next semester?
  • Poli Sci majors. In this crazy political climate, they could give you the low-down on recent political happenings every two weeks (with a well thought-out Christian approach), and help your ministry know when/how to respond. (Kinda like I suggested here.)
  • History major. This guy could present a “This Day in Christian History” for each Large Group Meeting, he could join with the Poli Sci group I mentioned above, or he could write some “biblical response” articles for you – even if it’s not directly history, it’s likely he’s learning how to write strong papers.
  • Fashion major. He designs your next T-shirt, of course.
  • Business major. Depending on your organization’s setup, she could actually help with the “business” or accounting side. But she could also “consult” you on organizational principles in general, as you plan next year’s small groups.
  • Hospitality major. Too many opportunities to list.
  • Creative writing. Blog! Social media! Start putting student testimonies on paper!

Sure, it can get a little tricky as you go. But the idea behind taking an asset-based approach to ministry is starting with whom God has brought us. And we remember that the goal isn’t a perfect match of skills + activities; the goal is discipleship and deepening involvement. So even tangential connections between their major and your campus ministry could mean a lot to a student.

And of course, students can help brainstorm this too. They’ll realize connections you don’t.