Finishing out my vacation week and a look at posts from Novembers past, here’s a Fridea…

Ultimately, it’s important that Student Leaders come to see themselves as your fellow College Ministers, just as international missionaries work to raise up indigenous leaders who fully “own” the mission (while remaining part of the tribe).

If you can get your students to that point, then spending time brainstorming with them about the mission only makes sense.Yes, they’ll need direction. Yes, they’ll probably have to hear some “Nos” to their Big Ideas – although

Yes, they’ll need direction and guardrails for that brainstorming. Yes, they’ll probably have to hear some “Nos” to their Big Ideas – although couching that response in “we’ll have to see if it works out” terms may be good. (Better, help your newly-fellow college ministers see why lots of good ideas, though “good,” aren’t best.)

Taking this a step toward the concrete: What if this sort of brainstorming became the focus of a special night – or even a college student (or leadership team) retreat?

“Brainstorming Brouhaha?” “Conspire Camp?” “Rack-our-brains Retreat?” Whatever you call it, if it’s done well, letting students brainstorm about specific areas of the ministry and possibilities for the upcoming semester or school year could unleash all sorts of great new ideas. They are, after all, the indigenous leaders – there are lots of reasons foreign missionaries try to raise them up to impact their own tribes, but one of them is because indigenous leaders know their tribe best.

One tip for making this great

Before I close out this Fridea, I want to point back to a principle that will make-or-break this experience for your ministry: teaching your students (and yourself) to build methods around purposes, not vice versa. (I call it Backwards College Ministry, and you can read about it here.) Teach your students that stuff first, and this activity really could generate some fantastic next steps for your campus ministry.