If you’re willing to believe that recruiting students is a form of discipleship (as I argued yesterday), then we’ve got to start assessing our recruitment not just by “how many students say yes” but also by how effectively we impact students’ spiritual growth while in the process of recruiting.

In other words, a “win” is no longer defined simply by whether students signed up, but whether they were impacted in other ways too.

And while we usually think about recruitment in terms of drawing students to join our ministries, I’m also speaking of recruiting students to other kinds of involvement once they’re already members – service projects, small groups, a one-time event, etc.

So what are some ways we can effectively disciple through our recruitment (recruitment of all sorts)? Borrowing the topics from a couple of past posts, here are some ideas:

1. Help students desire SOME sort of involvement

One way to disciple college students is by encouraging them toward involvement in something. Even if they don’t jump in to our ministry or into the opportunity we’re pushing, we have the chance to raise their interest level.

Of course, this means that disciplemaking-recruitment requires us to be Kingdom-minded and open-handed, knowing that not every student will “land” where we might hope. In any case, stirring their desires for involvement is an impactful step.

2. Teach them, don’t just tug them

It’s easy for our recruitment to be heavy on the sis-boom-bah of promoting involvement and be quite light on teaching. So to make our recruitment more “disciply,” what could we teach?

  • How to make decisions in general
  • Good and bad reasons to choose a college ministry (or whatever arena we’re presently recruiting to)
  • Why involvement (of whatever kind we’re preaching) really matters, biblically
  • How to balance commitments with the other portions of their life
  • Making commitments wisely and keeping them faithfully
  • Why they may NOT be fit presently for something we’re recruiting others to

As you think specifically about what you’re recruiting students to do, you should be able to identify other teaching topics. And that’s the point – to make teaching a part of our recruitment.

More tomorrow. (Read that here)