Haven’t had a chance to plan something for Spring Break? Or have a bunch of students who don’t have plans yet?

This is a repost from the past, but it’s useful if you’re open! These require little planning but could still have a real impact.

  1. The full-but-unplanned mission trip. If you’ve been reading the blog for a long while, you’ve seen me write about the Mad Libs eBay Road Trip I took students on. If you decide to do this, I might be able to help with explanation / ideas / locations – let me know.
  2. Stay local! Another thought is to have a “mission trip” without the trip! Simply organize as many of the basic “mission trip” elements as you want – service projects, evangelism, devotional times, fellowship, tourist activities, staying in a motel (or people’s houses), etc. But do them all locally. Not only is this easier to plan, it’s less expensive AND helps your students better see the mission field that has been under their noses.
  3. Rethink your purposes. While I know the classic mission trip based on service and/or evangelism is so often our “go-to” for Spring Break, does it have to be? What purposes does God have in mind for your group? Are some of them in other areas – like training/teaching? building community? stretching? something else? A local activity (or even a trip) focused on any of these areas might be exactly what a college group needs… which means it’s no less “spiritual.” But some of those might be simple to plan, too.
  4. Prepare students for their “individual mission trips.” One final idea is to use the fact that you’ve got no “special” Spring Break activity as a teachable moment for your students. (If you do have a trip planned, this still applies for all the students who aren’t going.) Do your students see their own Spring Break activities as a mission trip of their very own? They’ll be among friends or parents or classmates or fellow employees or people back home, right? Except for that last example, those are chances to impact! Are your students heading into Spring Break wide-eyed and watching for what God’s “mission” for them might be?