Toward the end of seminary, I realized that even graduate school allows for some level of “transfer credits.” So while I quite enjoyed my school, I took the opportunity to attend courses – in my case, two specialized Greek classes and a “Faith in Film” course – that weren’t offered at my institution.

I was only highly disappointed that I didn’t figure out the opportunity earlier. Not only was this a fantastic chance to get access to something new, but I also got to learn alongside different types of people. So I didn’t just get to take a class on the Book of Acts in Greek, for instance, but I got to take it alongside Christians who view the early church differently than I do.

Anyway – I really just wrote all that as a metaphor for this week’s Fridea: Look for additions to your college ministry activities outside the fold of your own organization or church.

This week I had two conversations about this very thing: One college minister at a Christian school was considering helping his students connect with Cru mission trips, alongside his normal denominational offerings. And another, a church-based college minister, was looking at attending a conference produced by (and almost entirely made up of) members of a parachurch college ministry.

In your own town, churches likely offer everything from women’s Bible studies to weekend conferences to service projects to mission trips. And your college minister compatriots are readily connected to collegiate-specific opportunities, like the two mentioned above and far more. (Many of the denominations and national parachurch orgs have some fantastic curriculum and tools, too.)

So how ’bout it? As you’re looking under rocks for new opportunities for your own students, could you consider moving beyond your own homegrown stuff? To quote myself, “Not only is this a fantastic chance to get access to something new, but your students also got to learn alongside different types of people.”