Yesterday, I wrote about the value of sharing our mission with our students – both being very open about our calling to reach their campus(es), as well as calling them participate with us. This is another way we can – even should be – different from youth ministries. We’re more explicit about our strategies and our plans, as we work with nearly-adult students, in the context of a missions calling.

Apparently those concepts were transferred well at Anderson University, a Baptist college in South Carolina that happens to have a Baptist Collegiate Ministries within its structure. When my dad visited Anderson recently, he was told a fascinating story.

According to the school, when BCM Director David Neace felt called to take a job with the BCM at Coastal Carolina (across the state), his students pushed back a little – not because they demanded he stay, but because they wanted to make sure he left in the right way. Instead of Neace simply leaving, students decided, they would commission him to go!

Neace hinted at this in a blog from last semester:

We are thankful because our students have seen this as a commissioning rather than abandonment.

Who knows if they used the verbiage I might have – “commissioning him to work among the Chanticleers tribe” – but all the same, these students got it. This is missions, and we are missionaries.

Have we expressed the underlying “missions” nature of collegiate ministry to our students this well? Would your students see the need to “commission” you, if you were moving to a new campus tribe?