One way to evaluate your college ministry is to ask yourself – and your student leaders and other volunteers – if the level of community is helping students “own up” to the sin in their lives – especially sin that would be most tempting to hide.

My fear is that in plenty of college ministries, it might be pretty easy for a student to plug-in fully… while nursing a “secret sin” throughout their collegiate ministry career. And that’s not meant to be a harsh rebuke: Actually, I’d argue that it takes active and skillful effort to construct a ministry with the level of community needed here. I’m sure I would have a tricky time with that, too.

Furthermore, even the most intimate community won’t necessarily expose every skillfully-hidden habit, and ultimately the responsibility is on each student to come clean to Jesus and to others.

But even though that’s true, I think most of us would agree that certain types of community better facilitate confessing, repenting of, and warring against sin. So surely we’d hope to create a structure that offers the kind of honest accountability, open communication, and level of safety that help our students to come into the light on these issues.

Right?

If all that’s true, how’s your ministry doing here? Because the truth is, lots of students have sin issues they’ve been “managing” or hiding… so lots of those should eventually be coming to light in your ministry each semester.

Right?

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